May

image1

The 6 May heralds the first of wedding buckets of this year. Frost, in almost May.
I hope that will be the last of it.

There were 2 weddings for the sixth, and I planted accordingly.
Just ‘touching base’ with Bride 2 the other day, she informed me that had “chosen to go with another ‘florist”. Of course that is her/their prerogative, but clearly needed a lesson in common courtesy. My old Mum always said that good manners cost nothing. Just saying…..
Ah well – whinge over- onwards.

WEDDINGS

image1[1]
There are other Weddings on the wall planner. Both Do it Yourself Buckets and arranged!
Bouquets, posies, buttonholes, boutonnières corsages. All home grown, British, scented, sophisticated or (my own favourite) country style flowers. Bring them on.

THE INEVITABLE WEATHER

image1[3]
Despite the sudden cold weather and frost, things are looking good in the cutting garden.
But I suspect in common with some other British Flower growers (mighty or humble) I seem to running to stand still.
As ever we are all subject to the vagaries of the British weather. It has been glorious but also it has been chilly, windy, with a touch frost and a flurry of snow.
Although it has been warmer in the sunshine and shelter, I for one would like to see the back of this ‘winter’ for once and for all.

So far the ‘wildflowers’ and annuals are coping (fingers firmly crossed).
My new cheapee polytunnel has been brilliant and has served me well. So between the two polytunnels I have managed to get on, despite the weather.

I still have lots to do but, with longer days, I am optimistic that I can get even more beds dug for even sweet peas, annuals, roses, scented flowers and other perennial and foliage plants,that still need to be released from their ‘holding’ pots and planted into the ground.
Busy times.

FAMILY MATTERS

image9
My husband, John, has just had a hernia operation, and therefore is unable to help with the digging.
It WAS the digging that caused it in the first place.
Hopefully he will soon be on the mend.
But help will soon be on hand.
As a return favour for ‘dog sitting’, my lovely Brother in Law, Rodney will help with some manual labour.
Rodney says that he is no gardener, BUT HE CAN DIG. Yay!!
I have way too many plants waiting patiently for more permanent beds.
Help is at hand.

SPRING

image1[4]
Spring is the best, and my favourite season here at Frogwell Flowers.
If we ever want/need to sell up Frowell Flowers, then Springtime would be the season that the plot looks it’s best.
But for the foreseeable future, I am going to continue working with the elements, keep growing, and hopefully selling, my British flowers, wild flowers, woodland style foliage and natural, country style flowers here in Devon.

ESCAPE TO THE COUNTRY

image1[5]
A couple of days ago I escaped from the plot to meet the lovely, helpful and inspiring Pat Cottam of the ‘Forgotten Flower Garden’ in Combe Martin, North Devon.
What a beautiful plot in a stunning location. I love her down to earth approach, and admire her for her tremendous hard work to make a success from her ‘challenging’ plot.
The visit did make me appreciate my ‘on tap’ water, and the ability to make a cup of coffee without using a generator.
One great advantage of her lovely plot is that once you are there you are there.
No popping home to be distracted by household chores.
Her newly prepared plot for ‘Pick Your Own’ is a great idea, but Pat will be the first to admit that, like us at Frogwell Flowers, we do lack any passing trade, and the vehicles that do pass by probably aren’t the kind that might just stop to pick up a bunch of my ‘home grown flowers.

THE PROMISE OF THINGS TO COME.

image1[6]
Looking out of the window on this Bank Holiday weekend, perhaps I was too hasty putting that washing out on the line. The splats of rain on the window indicates to me that it won’t be drying anytime soon. However it doesn’t look sufficient to give the ground the good soaking that it needs. Me and my bright ideas!
There is a saying- Rain before seven, stops by eleven. Let’s hope there is a bit of truth in that
In my ever hopeful way of trying to find my ‘niche’ in this precarious flower growing malarkey,
I have been considering even more potential avenues to pursue. I know….
No one can accuse me of not trying!

image1[7]

Looking out of the window on this Bank Holiday weekend, perhaps I was too hasty putting that washing out on the line. The splats of rain on the window indicates to me that it won’t be drying anytime soon. However it doesn’t look sufficient to give the ground the good soaking that it needs. Me and my bright ideas!
There is a saying- Rain before seven, stops by eleven. Let’s hope there is a bit of truth in that
In my ever hopeful way of trying to find my ‘niche’ in this precarious flower growing malarkey,
I have been considering even more potential avenues to pursue. I know….
No one can accuse me of not trying!
I have been trying to convince myself that there is a market out there for Welcome Flowers. Despite my ferocious targeting of this market on Facebook, Instagram and even on this ‘fledgling’ website, it is not proving to be a an over nigh success yet.
But with Summer allegedly here, maybe the potential for British, homegrown, scented, ethically grown flowers, welcoming your paying guests will catch on.
I have a vast range of vessels, vases, containers and all kinds of props to suit every style and situation and I can deliver, arrange and collect.
Why not order some cut flowers and foliage for your reception area, your shop display, your bar/pub/restaurant/ table tops?
I know that the supermarket has cut flowers that you can get from down the road, but you and I know they are what they are.
I can deliver on all counts so – here goes. Nothing ventured nothing gained.

Also I am go to have a another ‘pop’ at postal flowers- if ‘Bloom and Wild’ can do it then I might as well give it my best shot.
First Birthday flowers heading out now. Wish me luck.
Sadly, much as I would love to support the local market in Tiverton, unfortunately, it is still poorly attended and supported by the local community.
Despite the lovely compliments, ‘likes’, and all the hard work that it took, the market is not financially worth my while, and I reluctantly gave it up as a bad job.
So sad, such potential, so badly supported. I really admire the stalwarts that ‘hang on in there’. For me, life’s too short and I have to find different outlets if I can.
I love my town, Tiverton, but clearly the Tivertonians are not quite ready to support the British Flowers growers yet!

LAST BUT NOT LEAST.
24th Mid Devon Show on Saturday 22 July.
Btw- logo designed by one of my Graphic Design students many moons ago.
I’m not abandoning my local community!
I will be exhibiting/ selling at the show. Sadly I missed it last year but I’m going for it this time.
ANOTHER BUSY YEAR.
I hope it’s a successful one for us all.

 

 

February

Next week will be better.
Next week I’ll get more done.
Next week it’ll stop raining.
Next week the sun will shine.
Next week ….
This seems to be my mantra at the moment.
As a flower farmer I’m still a relative newbie, this flower growing malarkey has had me on a very steep learning curve.

The List
A list is what I work by, but, day by day my plans seem to be thwarted.
The list gets longer, but fortunately so do the days.
I look at my plot and my heart sinks.
But because of my inability to tackle my A list, I revert to the B list.
The B list is one that requires no digging, but it enables you to plan and reflect.

The Plan
Planning is a risky business, and as we all know ‘the best laid plans…
Reflecting is a much more pleasant task. You can scroll through the photos of your cut flowers, and IG feed and ‘WOW’.
The seed did germinate, the wild flowers did grow and the customers were pleased with my ‘grown not flown’ countrystyle flowers.
They included all the elements that I love and nurture.
British flowers that include all the natural, homegrown, strictly seasonal flowers are what I grow.
My flowers hopefully reflect a rustic, artisan style, that will appeal to those who do not want the rigid, stiff, imported blooms and the ‘fixed’ style that seems to accompany them.

The Flowers
All the flowers and foliage are grown here at Frogwell Flowers. From my plot I am able to supply a range of flowers that will delight the senses.
If you glance through my gallery you will get a taste of my style and vision.
I am more that happy to discuss with my customers the range of colours, textures, and their vision for their ‘special occasion’ celebration or ‘commemorative event’ – whatever it might be. Your wishes can be encorporated in the plan at this stage
As in fashion and design everywhere the new year brings in different colours, styles, and choices. It is the same with flowers.

My Passion
My passion is to please, and fulfill the dreams of my clients, to the very best of my ability.
Whether it be ‘wild’ ‘woodland’ ‘scented’ ‘rustic’ ‘informal’ ‘bright’ ‘pastel’ I’m sure that I can provide.
Diy buckets, arranged, hand tied, jam pot posies- I love them all.
But- the choice is ALWAYS yours.
Even if I say so myself looking back, there have been some lovely flowers. Every year that I grow scented sweet peas, roses, seasonal bulbs, wildflowers, bee friendly, flowers and foliage my love of my ‘job’ grows alongside the blooms.
There is no way that my chosen path is an easy one. It came to me later in my life, but would I change it?
NO WAY!
Terri

February

 

Valentine’s Day is almost upon us here at Frogwell Flowers.
Because all of our flowers are ‘grown not flown’ we will not be featuring ‘frozen’ roses.
Spring is almost here, so we will be looking forward to Spring flowers- Tulips, Narcissi, Hyacinth, and if we are really lucky homegrown Ranunculus.
Foliage to complement my flowers has always been key to me.

Foliage
Luckily our ‘good old Devon’ hedgerows provide plenty of wild woodland foliage and wild flowers. My cultivated blooms supply and augment that natural woodland, wildflower vibe, with British garden and Annual flowers to contribute to the ‘country style’ that I love.
On the plot all wildlife and every kind of bird (even my wayward chickens) are welcomed.
I really love them but….
When I venture on to the flower garden/plot, what I do not want to encounter is squidgy soil that tell me that moles have been very active undermining our efforts. Something has also been munching my bulbs in the polytunnel.
Does anyone else have this dilemma? I am advised to put down traps. My very experienced friend says that ‘it has to be done’.
I try to work in harmony with nature and while I am writing this ‘Winter Watch’ is celebrating the murmurations of starlings.
I have ducked, as a flock of starlings have ‘swooshed’ over my head in the cutting garden.
It seems that peoples’ attitudes are changing (thank goodness) in all areas of our lives.
We are supporting and encouraging local businesses like mine and hundreds of others, I would like to think.
We all need to support local, and I believe the ‘grown not flown’ mantra is a good one.
I do not want to devalue the appeal of ‘foreign’ flowers that are found in our local Supermarkets and florists, but there’s also should be a place for British ‘homegrown ‘ ‘artisan’ flowers.
Seasonal wild flowers and woodland style arrangements should be part of our DNA.
We all love the exotic, out of season flowers on occasion but we all need to support local and embrace seasonal BRITISH’ flowers.